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Welcome to Middle School at CCS

 

The Middle School at CCS is a loving and academically rigorous environment.

Students are challenged to excel and grow academically, physically, spiritually and socially. They serve in their communities and one another. We partner with parents to provide a stimulating, inspiring education in which students feel safe to fail and strong enough to succeed. In the Middle School, we do all things to the glory of God. Studying math, science, history, English – indeed all subjects – reflect the glory of God and moves our hearts to see the power, compassion and love of a loving Father.

Please click on the "Middle School Overview" link below for a full description of our curriculum.

Check out our links to the right for information about our curriculum, view pictures of our diverse programs, and find information about summer reading and math.

Join us as we journey with God to learn, to grow and to serve. Go Catamounts!

Textbook notice: Families are required to purchase textbooks for middle school students from the vendor of their choice. Books for lower school students are supplied by the school.

 

Introduction to Pre-Algebra
Introduction to Pre-Algebra is designed to introduce abstract concepts to students to prepare them for Pre-Algebra. The main topics covered are an introduction to equations, expressions and equations with variables, and coordinate graphing. In addition, fundamental mathematical concepts are revisited and intensified with a broader focus on application. By the end of Introduction to Pre-Algebra, the student will be able to move confidently into Pre-Algebra and beyond. Through the exploration of basic mathematics and the introduction of algebraic concepts, the student will be able to see God’s hand in and around us. Through the exploration of mathematical and algebraic concepts the student can explore his/her environment and see the undeniable handiwork of God.

Pre-Algebra
This course follows Introduction to Pre-Algebra. The main topics covered are: integers and absolute values; adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers; graphing in four quadrants; and translations and reflections on the coordinate plane. The course also covers the concepts of operations with rational numbers, multi-step expressions, equations and inequalities, ratio, proportion, similar figures, linear functions and graphing. Through the exploration of fundamental algebraic concepts, the student will be able to see God’s hand in and around us. The exploration of mathematical and algebraic applications allows the student to explore his/her environment and see the undeniable handiwork of God. At the end of this course, students can confidently apply the concepts learned in the next math course, Algebra I.

 

Algebra I
Algebra is the first fully abstract math course taught in middle school. The main topics covered are solving equations, explorations with variables, coordinate graphing, rational numbers, factoring, and quadratic functions. Through the exploration of fundamental algebraic concepts, the student will be able to see God’s hand in and around us. The exploration of mathematical and algebraic applications allows the student to explore his/her environment and see the undeniable handiwork of God. By the end of Algebra I, with a thorough understanding and ownership of the concepts taught, the student will be able to move into Geometry or Algebra 2 and beyond.

 

Geometry
This class is an exploration of our environment and the two- and three-dimensional figures that are naturally occurring. We can see God’s handiwork in all creation by studying and examining geometry in our environment. As students become proficient in proving mathematical scenarios, they will also learn to find practical and spiritual value in responding logically and reasonably to whatever circumstances in which God places them. Algebra and its applications are embedded throughout the program; therefore, successful completion of Algebra 1 is a must. The course includes properties of geometric figures, trigonometric relationships, reasoning, proofs and inductive/deductive reasoning. The program’s emphasis on geometry vocabulary, reading and writing in mathematics, and standardized test practice will contribute to building students’ confidence.

Science 6

The sixth-grade science class is a balance of life and physical science that prepares students for further study in these areas. The textbook is an overview of ecology, classification of life, cells, natural and man-made resources, chemistry, physics, the solar system, rocks, minerals, water, and energy. The theory of evolution will be addressed while explaining to the students that it is not science but a belief system. The students will learn what some of the arguments are and why they do not stand the test of true science the way the scientific community defines it. The students will work in the metric system and when applicable, apply math skills. Special emphasis is placed on the research process including the generation and testing of ideas, prediction, measurement, data collection and representation, evaluation of sources of information, interpretation and communication of findings. This is supported by the students’ involvement in individual science projects culminating in participation in a science fair. The multi-day science camp trip supports the curriculum with hands-on and experiential learning while covering many of the SOL’s.

Life Science 7

The seventh-grade science class is a beginning study of life science that provides students with a strong foundation for further study of biology in high school. Life Science is an investigation into the world of living things that God created as described in Genesis. Our textbook, therefore, was written by Godly men who believe the Bible to be the inerrant Word of truth. Creation vs. Evolution will be discussed at length and students should come away with a good understanding of both. While it is important to know and understand the concepts of evolution, the emphasis will be on God’s creation and how it interacts and works. As Isaac Newton said, “The purpose of science is to understand the mind of God.” In addition, the themes studied include: life’s structure and function; bacteria; plants; animal diversity; and human body systems. Special emphasis is placed on the research process including the generation and testing of ideas, prediction, measurement, data collection and representation, evaluation of sources of information, and interpretation and communication of findings. This is supported by the students’ involvement in individual science projects culminating in participation in a science fair.

Physical Science 8

The eighth-grade science class is a beginning study of physical science that provides students with a strong foundation for further study of chemistry and physics in high school. The major themes addressed are: energy and motion, electricity and energy resources, and the nature of matter. Energy is studied in relationship to motion and work, in the form of electricity, and in its various forms of movement. Matter is studied in relationship to its classification, its state and as it interacts with other matter. The theory of evolution will be addressed while explaining to the students that it is not science but a belief system. The students will learn what some of the arguments are and why they do not stand the test of true science the way the scientific community defines it. The students will work in the metric system and when applicable apply math skills. Special emphasis is placed on the research process including generation and testing of ideas, prediction, measurement, data collection and representation, evaluation of sources of information, and interpretation and communication of findings. This is supported by the students’ involvement in individual science projects culminating in participation in a science fair.

 

History 6: American History

Students will study primary and secondary sources to learn about life in the United States from 1800 to present. Industrial and westward growth will be explored as students learn about the Jackson Era and Manifest Destiny. Sectional differences between the Northern and Southern states will be traced. Religious, educational, and cultural reform movements will be examined. Causes and effects of the Civil war will be explored, and students will learn about Reconstruction. Development of the western frontier, the growth of industry, and the growth of American cities will be investigated. Next, the Progressive movement and the changes it brought to the U.S. will be discovered. The causes of World War I and the role of the United States in this war will be explored and discussed. Students will then move into the challenges of the early 1900s, the Great Depression, and World War II. Changes in the United States after World War II will be examined, and students then move into the Cold War, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War. The course will culminate with a study of the presidents from Nixon to Obama and the War on Terrorism. God’s hand in the continuing development of our nation and the different events that shape us are discussed from a Biblical worldview.

 

History 7: Old World History

An understanding of the events and people that have shaped our world over the past centuries is essential for future academic studies and to help us better understand our roles and responsibilities as citizens of both the United States of America and the world itself. The course will be presented as a survey course, which will begin with the rise and growth of early civilizations and progress through to the years immediately following the Renaissance and Reformation. We will also examine regional civilizations and their impact on world history. Students will look at history through the eyes of the people living at that time so that they can better understand the thoughts and goals that led to the actions and decisions that occurred. Video-tapes, both documentary and historical drama and hands-on activities will help the course come alive for all students. All topics are discussed from a Biblical worldview.

 

History 8: Civics

The topics covered will be: foundations of American Government, the United States Constitution, the three branches of the federal government, state and local governments, political ideologies, as well as participating in government. While the text book is secular, this class will be taught from a Biblical perspective. The importance of Christians participating in Government will be emphasized. Also, different political ideologies will be discussed from a Biblical worldview. Emphasis will be placed on the Constitution and memorization of the amendments. Political parties’ philosophies will be discussed and all will be presented without bias. Also, we will examine the relationship of the United States to other nations. Internet research will be assigned and current events will be studied and discussed. Economics will be presented at a basic level.

 

English 6

God created man with the ability to communicate. Through this course students will study different ways of communicating. It is an integrated program of reading and writing skills, activities, and applications of the skills. Students are taught effective methods of communication both orally, as well as written. Areas of focus are: critical thinking; development of literary background; grammar, usage, spelling, mechanics through the writing process; and oral communication skills. Skills are taught through individual, small group and large group learning experiences. Students are exposed to different genres of literature such as short stories, novels, poetry, and drama.

English 7

Students will now begin focusing on refining written and verbal communication skills with special attention to organization, word choice, and grammar in written work. They will continue to expand their vocabulary to articulate thoughts more effectively. They will also learn how to find and use primary and secondary sources, and how to give appropriate credit to those references according to MLA guidelines. Finally, students will study various types of literature and be able to identify literary elements as well as worldviews present in each text. They will then compare the worldview with the Biblical perspective. Communication of the various worldviews will be practiced and improved as God is the master communicator.

 

English 8

Throughout this course, the students learn that our God is a God of communication and language. Because God has given humans the gift of language, students will learn to use this gift to the best of their abilities to help further His Kingdom and to give glory to Him. This will be accomplished through the study of the variety of ways in which humans communicate. An integrated approach will be taken as students are challenged to read, write, research, and orally communicate through a biblical perspective. Vocabulary expansion, grammar skills, and literature analysis are all studied to improving written and oral communication skills to glorify God.

 

Bible 6: The Life of Christ

This Bible course focuses on the life of Christ. Students will be inspired by the example of Christ’s own life experiences and the way He dealt with both friends and enemies. In addition, many other valuable lessons will be drawn from Christ’s sermons, miracles, and parables. Included in the study are historical, cultural, and geographical background information to Christ’s life, charts and maps, lesson reviews, and recommended memory verses. Christ’s Sermon on the Mount is discussed and the students will learn how to apply it to their lives. As the student learns this material, emphasis will be place on who Jesus is and not just on what he did. Understanding who Jesus is will have the largest impact on every aspect of the students’ lives.

 

 Bible 7: The Old Testament

This Bible course presents the Old Testament not as a series of unconnected stories, but as the Bible’s one story. God is at work redeeming His fallen creation—climactically through Jesus—and every small story in the Bible makes sense only in light of that big story. The Old Testament still teaches moral lessons, but Gideon and Noah and Moses are not the big heroes; God is. The historical books, as well as “The Writings”—Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon, are covered. Critical thinking skills are incorporated, helping students to remember, understand, and apply Scripture.

As each is studied, life and spiritual lessons will be applied to the 7th grade world in which our students live. Students will learn how to actively engage in conversations where the Bible is criticized and learn how to defend the truth with evidence. By learning the factual evidence to support their faith, students will have increasing confidence to share their faith with the world. The students will examine the reliability of the Bible and its significance as a historical document.

 

Bible 8: Lessons from the Early Church

This Bible course leads students to understand and apply the book of Acts and the early letters of Paul (Galatians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, and Romans). Each lesson includes critical-thinking questions that foster the deepening of and personalization of each student’s faith. This class will examine the concept of a worldview and how God’s truth applies to all of life. There is an emphasis on how to discern truth from error, and how to actively live out truth. Since a worldview determines (consciously or unconsciously) how people interpret and respond to everything in life, it is essential to be grounded in Biblical beliefs.

 

Spanish 6 – Beginning Spanish 1

Students will begin to develop the use of simple Spanish vocabulary and expand their understanding of the cultures of Spanish speaking countries. They will learn the basic skills of speaking, writing, reading, and listening in Spanish through fun activities like music, games, and hands-on activities. By the end of this year of study, the student will have completed the first half of Spanish 1.

Spanish 7 – Completion of Spanish 1

Students will begin to develop their communicative competence in Spanish and expand their understanding of the cultures of Spanish speaking countries. They will learn to read, to talk, to write, and to listen in Spanish. Students will be able to learn the new language through integration of technology and through the use of authentic materials to learn about the culture. By the end of this year of study, following Spanish 6 at CCS, the student will have completed Spanish 1 and be eligible for 1 full high school credit in foreign language.

 

Spanish 8 – Spanish 2

Students will continue to develop their communicative competence in Spanish by interacting orally and in writing. They will make oral and written presentations. They will read material on familiar topics and write short, directed compositions. Emphasis will be made on communicating orally about their daily activities and immediate world. At the completion of this year of student, the student is eligible for a second full high school credit in foreign language.

Concert Band

The performance-centered course will provide a basic introduction to playing in a Concert Band (Wind Ensemble) and associated performance techniques on select instruments. Basic playing technique (including healthy posture and warm-ups) will be introduced and reinforced throughout the course. Students will develop the basic aural and psychomotor skills needed for successful tone production, developing and demonstrating pitch accuracy. Solo, group, and basic part-playing will be introduced to students – opportunities to play songs in an arrangement of styles and genres will be provided. This course will build upon prior knowledge attained in General music courses with regards to music theory (note reading and writing) and musical history (composers, genres and styles). Concert Band students apply the elements of music theory, explore musical history and culture, learn how to prepare and execute successful musical performances and learn how to use musical skills developed to worship the Lord through song and movement. Students in band use music as a form of self-expression and learn to appreciate its value and significance in the world around them as an aesthetic specifically created by God.

 

Concert Choir
The course will provide a basic introduction into choral singing and performance techniques. Basic singing technique (including healthy posture, vocal warm-ups, and diction) will be introduced and reinforced throughout the course. Students will develop the basic oral and aural skills needed for healthy singing, developing and demonstrating pitch accuracy. Solo, group, and basic part-singing will be introduced to students – opportunities to sing an arrangement of styles and genres will be provided. Various performance opportunities may be offered depending on the size and progress of the choir. Choir students apply the elements of music theory, explore musical history and culture, learn how to prepare and execute successful musical performances and learn how to use musical skills developed to worship the Lord through song and movement. Students in choir use music as a form of self-expression and learn to appreciate its value and significance in the world around them as an aesthetic specifically created by God.

 

Middle School Worship Team
This ensemble is a volunteer team consisting of middle school student leaders that meets weekly. The student worship leaders help select, rehearse and prepare to lead their peers in worship at chapels and special events throughout the year. Students often have an opportunity to explore a wide range of worship music, including but not limited to contemporary gospel, hymns and contemporary Christian music. This elective offers our students the unique opportunity to grow as worshippers and worship leaders in a supportive environment.

 

A complete course of instruction is offered in Computer Science and Technology for middle school. The instruction emphasizes critical thinking and the use of computers as tools for creative writing, data gathering, analysis, storage, retrieval, organization and presentation. Continued instruction on keyboarding from previous grades and building on students understanding of the computer interface as a mimic of the business environment increase confidence in our computer saturated society. The introduction of professional-level integrated office tools (word processor, spreadsheet, database, presentation, Internet) and continual emphasis on picking the right tool for the right job equip students for their futures. Skills are integrated with other core subjects (English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies/History, Languages) through the application of software to produce assignments for those subjects. Coding is also taught enabling students to expand their critical thinking skills.

Students are offered a variety of challenging activities with an emphasis on fitness for life. Unit themes include team sports and personal fitness. Students create and play small group games that involve cooperating with others to keep an object away from opponents. Through these activities, they demonstrate knowledge of basic rules, strategies, and safety procedures of variety of sports and games.

Study Skills

The goal of study skills is to equip students to be academically successful in middle school and beyond. Some topics covered in this class are: how to stay organized, note taking skills, how to study for a test, reading strategies, how to give an oral report, proper internet research, and time-management. This is one class that students should be able to apply to all other disciplines. Using 21st century technology tools to study effectively and increase organization skills must be balanced with online safety and security. This class will be interactive and project based. We will do many activities in pairs or small groups, and most of the work will be done in class.

 

Art

This class provides “art experiences” for those gifted in the art area, as well as opportunities for the many students who will never produce art outside of the classroom. In these explorative classes, the principles and elements of art are mastered. Students continue to study the role and importance of art and art history in different cultures, including our own. Students will begin to develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments and understand the process of art criticism. A variety of media and techniques are explored.